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of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
millions of dollars with every weather event. it means creating a living environment for the people of haiti, and the government has the instruments available, the tools available to it to make a goal of regional planning. these instruments, the national center, supported by funds from the european union and others for regional planning, which, again, you contribute to with your funds. i wish to thank you for this contribution. let me say that our administration will use these funds to the hilt. in the longer time frame, so we can leave our fingerprints on the haitian area. as you can see in this area, this is on the front of those helping us. europe is at the forefront, able to continue to inspire everyone, and as the world realizes, they cannot go it alone. it has to be in the regions, the larger regions, so we can find a single voice, so we can give each other mutual support while maintaining identity. i say to them that all of our strategies and their solidarity has not been wasted. those that are most vulnerable are the ones then have benefited the most. there is taking shape i
2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
for years in the economy, and even our environment. as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states in 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving the environmental performance of our products, our facilities, and our operations. between 2000-2010, the amount of industry investment for technologies to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined, which were just slightly larger than what our industry invested. u.s. refiners have invested more than $137 billion since 1990 in technologies to produce even cleaner fuels and meet the growing variety of state and federal mandates. it complete transitions compared to gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tailpipe emissions by cars and light duty trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. and through increased efficiency, we are doing much more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to pro
participation. how society and in these environments as the bonds weren't as strong as they were in traditionally organized places. these are arguments for a long time. design, aesthetic and social arguments. but then a big change has been 15 years ago, the economy started talking. nobody listens to planners. which is shouting in the wind about why we feel certain things are certain ways. but i will miss them so me say say this'll make you poor and this make you richer. the.or started saying, these communities are killing us, which i begin to and finally even more recently the environmentalists figured out the city was the way to save the country and the countryside. those three issues, none of which original research on our parts form the basis for having a much more legitimate and arguable support for city life over suburban life. so what are they? the first question to ask is where do people want to be in america? in portland is a prime example. during the 90s, journal and neil population increased by 50%, which was five times the rate. educated no one else went up so much ire
patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well in which the islamic opposition could take greater root and was, essentially, you know, became more or and more vir you lent. there were a number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libya would in retrospect signal a, you know, to people who were watching this that things were not going well in libya, that essentially the people were getting increasingly frustrated with gadhafi and had the potential to be, to explode. you have the -- another seminal event was the pass kerr in -- massacre in 1996 in which 1250 people were killed. this was by gadhafi's head of -- under the supervision allegedly of gadhafi's head of internal intelligence. this was very important because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. and the east, you know, in a very tightly-knit tribal society an act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to haunt gadhafi, basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment a
of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't get something like a basic budget done. >> the problem is we're going to have to do some of this, anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you defer maintenance, if you say to yourself, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's actually a penny wise, pound-foolish decision. it will eventually break and cost you three times as much. that's what's happening with our roads, bridges and highways. if you look at air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated travel systems, we need to update the antiquated computer system. one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have a kind of the system will break down, it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> there's another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending around. some of that might be true. the bigger issue is nilements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat. it's the one that is
. economic growth is far from robust. another big problem is the low interest rate environment. >> essentially the challenge is the spread between what they can pay for deposits and what they can earn on loans because of these very low interest rates is compressed. that makes earning money difficult. >> reporter: that said, some argue it's a good time to buy bank stocks because valuations are still relatively cheap. at 11.2, the financial sector has the lowest price to earnings ratio of any group, based on projected 2013 earnings. jim sinegal isn't impressed. >> there's good reason banks should trade at lower multiple than other sectors. there's a lot of risk there. a lot of leverage and banks aren't going to be as profitable going forward as they were in the past. >> reporter: investors will be watching friday for more hints about the health of the sector. that's when wells fargo will become the first of the big banks to release fourth quarter numbers. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, tonight's "word on the street," electronics. how semiconductor giant in
of russia being their sole supplier. in this environment, subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago, we thought that china and india, and other emerging economies, my sign-on to emissions reductions, and, therefore, that if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't think it does but i don't tak take a position on whr mandated emissions caused global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population, are not doing so, when i pointed any affect on the global temperatures. and then the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions, that nobel prize-winning weiner thinks we can reduce global temperature if we just do it on our own. painting russ whitehurst like the sun's rays. what we are doing with a 12 and dollars were spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars that they don't want to buy, we are raising electricity costs. we are -- we're getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of fluorescent lightbulbs. and the cost of this fal
need predictable and their regulatory environment. the federal government shouldn't pick the winners and losers, or subject energy projects to endless and duplicative views -- reduce. such roadblocks have stymied vital products, like the keystone pipeline, and that must be built. we shouldn't stop epa's -- we should -- shouldn't have said it that way. it's getting wound up a little bit. we should stop epa's senseless and ideologically driven battle to ban the production and the use of coal. and we should continue with the next generations of nuclear power plants, and we should waste no time in pursuing research that develop alternative sources such as wind, solar, geothermal, and deficiency. that is where we have led the world. by fully embracing america's energy opportunity, we can accelerate growth, create millions of new jobs, free ourselves from less than stable global suppliers and create huge new revenues for government, which will help reduce our budget deficit. we also have an extraordinary opportunity to create growth and jobs through expansion of trade and investment and to
jointly. >> precisely. >> that kind of discussion feels dead on arrival in this political environment where we can't even get a budget done. >> and the problem is we're going to have to do some of this anyway. anyone who owns a home knows this. if you differ maintenance, my boiler is leaking but i'm not going to fix it, that's penny-wise but pound pool foolish. the whole thing will break and cost you three times the amount. air travel. we have one of the world's most antiquated air traffic systems. we need to update the computers. it's $25 billion. we're not spending that money because as you say spending is is a dirty word. but one day you're going to have terrible problems or you're going to have -- the system will break down. then it's not going to cost $25 billion. it will cost $50 billion. >> another thing we don't talk about enough. we're talking about spending as if there's this generally irresponsible spending. the bigger issue is entitlements, the growth in what those are going to cost us over time. that's the real threat, the one hardest to deal with because it's stuff peopl
on their balance sheets. but they're not investing and ask them why, they say, we don't know what the environment looks like. tell us what the environment looks like, so we can calculate the potential return on investments and we'll invest. if uncertainty prevails, the risk premium is very high and you price out a lot of investment activity that's good for everybody. >> they might go somewhere elsewhere they'll have more certainty. all of the fiscal cliff madness is about spending and revenue. in other words, what you would call a budget and there's nothing more broken in washington than the budget process. >> if you are not yet outraged. stay with us and you will be. people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-dr
environment so attractive and really few alternatives. is it really a function of the global economy, or is it more a function of this money that needs to find a place to go and u.s. equities seems to be best looking game in town? >> well, you know, i do think it's a lill bit of the latter. when you start looking at the velocity of the money, not trying to get too into the financial jargon, but we do have an issue where people are still seeking out safe money. however, if you look at growth of bank lending, commercial bank lending, what we call a credit growth, it's above 6% right now, so we do have banking and financial organizations wanting to lend money, and as they do that, that's going to create the capital to give those fundamentals that we sort of have forgotten about, but there's no denying that when the federal reserve is printing 85 billion a month it will have an effect. keep in mind, still looking at 8%, 10%, s&p corporate earnings growth. let's not get into an argument about top line growth. >> you're talking about the fourth quarter, 8% to 10% in the fourth quarter? >>
is summarize the threats we face in the broader strategic environment in which our counter-terrorism efforts take place. the death of osama bin laden marked a milestone in our efforts to defeat al qaeda. al qaeda's ranks have been decimated. more key leaders have been eliminated in rapid succession at any time since 9/11. virtually every major a al qaeda affiliate has lost its key leader or operational commander. more than half of their top leadership has been eliminated. al qaeda is on the ropes and continues to get pummeled. however, his death and the capture of many other al qaeda leaders and operatives do not mark the end of al qaeda or its continued plotting against the united states and other countries. the preeminent security threat to the ad states remains al qaeda and its adherents. since september 11, the counter- terrorism effort has been aimed at preventing the counter terror -- the counter efforts of al qaeda on the homeland. al qaeda continues to edify operatives overseas and develop new methods overseas to attack us at home. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core l
on the environment. narrator: the streets of havana are lined with reminders of the island's colonial history. but just a hundred miles to the south civilization gives way to cuba's primeval past. over a million acres of unspoiled caribbean wetlands -- cienaga de zapata -- zapata swamp. [ thunderclap, rain splashing ] zapata is considered the most important wetland in the hemisphere, and despite the embargo, the swamp already draws thousands of visitors from north america every year. cuba is a way station for nearly 300 species of migratory birds that breed in the united states. encompassing the infamous bay of pigs, every fall, zapata is now home to a different kind of invasion. clouds of warblers, ibis cranes and herons leave their summer homes along the eastern united states on a direct flight to cuba. millions of birds in flocks so enormous they blanket the sky on radar images. some fly over 1,500 miles, from as far north as new england and canada. many spend their winter here in the caribbean's largest protected wetlands. some will simply pause before hopping across the
competitive environment from which to go out and compete around the world and win. host: one thing we heard leading up to discussions late last year is that some type of certainty was needed from decisions made. did the people you represent find the guest: certainty there is some of it. much is to be done because long- term overhang is still serious. nobody believes that our current spending course is sustainable. we have made promises that cannot be paid for. maybe not tomorrow or five years from now, but down the road changes need to be made. you're seeing this at the state level where governors and in both parties and legislative bodies are coming together. watch illinois right now, they are struggling with their pension debt, but at the national level we have not had the success yet that some of the states of had. host: looking at spending federally, what has to be guest::the first quarter this year is one that debate will take place. you have the debt ceiling, a continuing resolution. at the end of march, the year is half over. did you have sequestration mandated. those are all intertw
. >> it should include an analysis of perpetrator strategies in a church environment, and detail how the church has dealt with cases of abuse when they became known as well as the action it took. >> the church says it will now find a new institutes to complete the study. thomas, one time altar boy and abuse victim, intends to watch them closely. >> for more on this now, we are joined by our political correspondent. this decision to stop the steady -- how badly has it damage the reputation of the church? >> pretty badly. the head of the german central committee of catholics said that he viewed the damage is very grave indeed, and, certainly, criticism is coming from the very highest levels. as you mentioned, the german justice minister has spoken out today. she said that the whole incident calls into question the church's real willingness to get to the bottom of the abuse scandal, and she went to bat for the academic who was supposed to have carried out this study. perhaps the church is therefore now making an effort to silence him. it has said that it will be seeking a legal injunction to stop
encountering this environment. our immune systems would not be adept at recognizing and fighting pathogens new to us. hawks: oh, it's absolutely a survival toolkit. hla types are important because they help our body resist disease. so it's very clear that one product of this interaction was the inheritance of immune system versions of genes. maybe they conferred some selective advantage. maybe the neanderthals have a version of these immune system genes that were beneficial for the neanderthal and they were beneficial to human people who got these genes by interbreeding. narrator: this is the epstein-barr virus linked to both mononucleosis and a type of blood cancer. green's team found that an hla we inherited from neanderthals could reduce the risk of contracting this deadly virus. but this may be just the tip of the iceberg. as we look more and more at the neanderthal genome and characterize what things are where, i think we're going to find more of these. narrator: it seems the neanderthals who mated with our human ancestors may have given their offspring a lifesavi
in every school is something that will enhance the learning environment, and that's our first responsibility inside of school, is the learning environment. you don't want to make this an armed camp for kids. i don't think that's a positive example for children. we should be able to figure out some other ways to enhance safety. >> new jersey governor chris christie. my next guest says armed guards are exactly what american schools need. in the wake of sandy hook elementary school massacre, sheriff joe arpaio has called for armed volunteers to patrol about 50 schools in his jurisdiction. welcome to you, sheriff. >> how are you doing, piers? >> explain to me why you believe that the answer to these gun massacres is to have a lot more guns. >> well, you know, i'm not going to get into that. we have many, many laws pertaining to guns already. we ought to enforce those laws, but i'm taking immediate action. i have a volunteer posse made up of 3,500 armed, well trained, 100 hours of training. we just finished another program at the malls. very successful. so why not utilize and mobil
assessments that might take against the various environments that the secretary mentioned. and we're engaged -- i've told you, we're engaged in planning to develop options against alternative futures. alternative future one collaboration or permissiveness all of which would have different requirements. >> you talk now possibility of training rebels -- >> i haven't heard that. that's not a request we've head. i don't know if they would have don't that request through some other channel. [inaudible] >> we're not working on options that involve boots on on the ground with, you know, i think you have to keep the possibility that if there is a peaceful transition and international organizations get involved they might ask for tax in that situation. but in a hostile situation, we're not planning for that. >> back to general dempsey, i asked whether there was militarily anything there was the u.s. could do to stop the assad regime from using chemical weapons. >> the act of preventing the use of chemical weapons wash almost unachievable, jennifer, you have to have such clarity of intelligence, you k
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
afghanistan will have the right environment for conducting elections without interference and without undue concern. we also discussed in a bit of detail and in the environment that we have all aspects of the bilateral security agreement between afghanistan and the united states, and i informed the president that the afghan people already have given their approval to this relationship and value it as one that is good for afghanistan. in that context, the bilateral security agreement is one that the afghan people approve, and i am sure we will conduct it in detail where both the interests of the united states and the interests of afghanistan will be kept in mind. we had a number of other issues also to talk about during our conversations, and perhaps many times in that conversation, beginning with the composition of, of course.-- the conversation, of course. i thanked the president for the help that the united states has given to the afghan people for all that we have gained in the past 10 years and that those gains will be kept by any standard while we're working for peace and stability in
it's had a tremendous year in production, but the political and security environment there remains very challenging. dagen: any other countries, saudi arabia, even the united states with its increasing production here that can make up any loss that we might see in iraq, like is there any cushion anywhere else in the world? >> well, you know, when you look at, you know, where we can see potentially within opec, the saudis are the ones who have their capacity. it becomes an interesting what the saudis will do in terms if we did see losses coming out of iraq. right now we've seen iraqi exports down 10% in december but have not seen a major attack on a facility. for now i think everyone is in sort of wait and see mode. another country you want to watch though is libya. libyan production has been another country that has allowed us to absorb the loss of iranian exports. you do want to watch, do we see any potential problems in libya? that's a country where the security situation does not remain very stable. dagen: thank you. >> thank you for having me. happy new year. connell: let's mov
. they're expensive. we're in a very cost sensitive environment still. people are losing their jobs. not just this year, all around the globe. they're saying i will not pony up, 1500 bucks, 800 bucks get it with bells and whistles you're talking about $1,000. they're not willing to do it. they haven't seen the offerings to --. lori: you could use your tablet or smartphone. >> exactly. that costs a lot less. you can buy a cheap google tablet for 199 bucks. lori: stick around we want to get your reaction to our next story here. >> great. melissa: that big company in the world, has its sights set on china. apple's tim cook says he expects to take over china as the second biggest market. company says sales in china more than doubled in 2010 and dwef ven. apple's biggest challenge in china is the smartphone market which is currently dominated by google's android system. when do you think china overtakes the u.s.? do you that is near term? does he think, next five years or is that like a 20 years? >> i don't think so. three to five years it will happen. there are still so many people who
interest rate environment, the weak dollar environment will come back and boost these battles. silver has lost even more momentum. start to look at these battles. after the debt talks are over, he thinks that everyone will go back. connell: listening to you very closely today. you got the alabama game right last night. didn't you pick alabama? sandra: i did. connell: sandra smith. thank you. dagen: and then you have a quarterback who dated a girl who went to auburn. it is a little past quarter past the hour. nicole: we are seeing at&t as one of the big laggards. at&t told more than 7 million smart phones in the fourth quarter. this is a record for them. obviously copying the prior numbers that we have seen. these telecom type companies are coming under pressure. here is a look at the broader market averages. the dow jones industrials down about 80 points right now. back to you. dagen: thank you. connell: we will talk to bret baier coming up. dagen: alabama's big moment in the spotlight. oh, the people came running on twitter. connell: joining us from vegas is nick cannon. a lot coming up.
an environment of better economic growth. rates might go higher. we think the immediate part of the curve is probably the safest place for the investors who are looking or think rates might be going up. then the other is you need to play the revenue space. there's a lot of high quality credits out there. but the yields are low. you're not really getting compensated. from a risk reward perspective, like health care and transportation, like housing and education offer a lot of value with not a lot of risk. >> so tell me how the fed plays into all of this, peter. there was all that noise last week about the division among fed members on how long the stimulus program should continue or will continue. if rates stay low and they don't fall any further, what's the impact of the growth in the muni bond market? how does that play into it? >> that's a great question. that's one we're talking about here as well. i think it's important to realize that the fed was only beginning to talk about having a debate or a discussion about removing that qe. so they've been anchoring on the long end of the marke
market sounds like a bull compared to that sort of an environment. >> let's talk about what harry just said though because he talked about the large umbrella-type situations that are really going to impact. demographics. >> yeah. >> the fact that the retail investor is gone. we're not going to have the same level of interest in stocks over the long term. he's expecting a big crash second half of the year. >> yeah. he's absolutely right. we've had bun buyer since 666 on the s&p in '09, the corporation itself. nobody else is in this buyer. can you imagine if somebody else does show up for a day or two? we could have a much better market. >> what's going to take us to those all-time highs, what area of the market do you want to be in to ride that wave? >> the multi-nationals. lagged the last couple of years. emerging market economies starting to do a bit better, and those companies that are geared in that direction. look, some of the u.s. companies will do fine, too. earnings are a question mark. that's -- that's part of the problem, but i think as financial and systemic risk mitigate som
environment. which renewables in particular do you see having that sort of potential? is it wind, solar, wave, geothermal? >> the kind of numbers i'm talking about, you double energy demand in the world and supply 30% of it from renewables from say 1% or 2%. >> where will it come from? >> certainly wind is part of that, maybe solar -- there's some optimism there's in breakthroughs potentially coming there. i think ultimately hydrogen may be on the table as part of that answer. i will say all of these are important. all of these potentially fill some of that space. they all need additional technology applied to them and we have to come down the cost curve. it's always interesting to look at what we as a company do. i'll tell you our focus right now when it comes to the emissions space and the idea why we would push renewables, our focus is around carbon -capturing storage and around biofuels, particular types of biofuels that meet this low co-2 potential standpoint. and we have a wind business but to be perfectly frank, it's not growing very fast. >> i hope we'll come back to this but let's mo
sustainable future where we are in harmony with the environment and the planet. a lot of corporations are doing those things, but not as well as corporations could. corporations could contribute still more toward human welfare and avoid doing damage in some areas where they do, if only we can correct what i have come to view as a very mistaken and ultimately counterproductive idea that has captured the business world. this is the idea that corporations are run well, when they are run to maximize shareholder value, specifically measured by share price. many people in the room may have the reaction, but isn't that something that has been accepted forever? don't we all know that the purpose of the corporation is to maximize profits for shareholders? i would say no, actually, that is not an idea that has been around forever. that is a pretty new idea. if you were to get in a time machine and go back and study the first eight decades of the 20th century, and it is at the beginning of the 20th century were refer start to see the great public corporations that we think of today when we think
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
up a much more friendly environment to talk about the issues. host: fawn johnson, correspondent with national journal, we're focusing the "washington journal" this morning on issues surrounding immigration. later on, we'll talk to some reporters as well as folks on both sides of the issue right here on n washington, d.c. haour first phone call is from ryan in texas on our democrats line. hi, ryan. caller: yes, how you doing? host: good. caller: i would like to say, they're not going to enforce the immigration laws. some of the people that i know out with these charges, that they're not going to follow immigration rules, just some of these guys that got these crack charges and trying to get back to their families. host: you're talking about drug charges? ok. let's go to trevor in arlington, virginia, on our independent line. hi, trevor. caller: hello. how you doing? host: good morning. caller: basically the premise of my question is, you know, everybody involved in deciding what's going to happen with immigration, you would think they would have to be thinking, how much more reve
campaigning for the environment. he says becoming a grandparent just makes that more important. he also says he worries every night because his sons don't just honor the military, they serve in it. in a rare interview, prince charles says he feels he will have to answer to his royal grandchild on the state of the environment. >> you are soon to be a grandfather for the first time, so many congratulations. >> i don't want to be confronted by my future grandchild, why didn't you do something? it makes it even more obvious to try to make sure that we leave them something that isn't a total -- >> reporter: environmental causes, something he shared with his children, growing organic vegetables on his farm and recently had an endangered frog named after him. >> we present you with a frog. >> reporter: but prince charles heir to the throne is also a military parent. immediate worry is prince harry serving as an apache helicopter pilot in afghanistan. in september his base was attacked by the taliban. it's his second tour of duty. >> if you are a parent or, you know, relation and the person is away
in this current fiscal environment to ensure the success of the space launch? >> thank you, sir. that is a tall order. i think one of the crucial things the consolation program was supposed to do is to provide a smooth transition for the work force and for the capability the nation has off of the shuttle program to what ever came next. and we've lost that now. the deep integration between the low earth orbit and the destinations that was hoped for i think is also gone. i would first say 2012 is not 2008. we are in a different and new situation today and we have to look at going forward. the primary, one of the primary problems with the end of the constellation was again cutting ourselves off from our international partners who didn't see how they were going to participate increasing risks to the international space station because while we certainly hope for and encourage and want to see the private sector to go for that work if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complemen
you would look at the material? >> we are all products of our experience, of our environment where we come from. i have been tempered by that experience about war. what war means, the consequences, who has to fight it. all of that experience is part of me and how i look at policy, how i look at our foreign policy, how i look at our military policy, how i judge consequences, how the world sees us, their trust in our purpose, in our power. no question that much of the questioning i've done about iraq even before we went in was conditioned tempered by that experience in vietnam. and whatever i will do in my life, whether it's in politics or outside, those experiences shape me just like anyone who has gone through war, those experiences shape you very much. one of the things it does is it makes you less inclined i suspect to jump into war. it's easy to get into war, not very easy to get out as evidenced by the johnson tapes. and you need to think through these things. diplomacy is critically important especially in the world we flive today. i think something else is important here and cer
into recession. it's been in a recession type environment for a while. and the only grimace of hope is that the chinese economy has been showing signs of growth and the japanese are earmarking trying to get their growth profile. it's a race to the bottom. last year, there was a lot of risk that people thought we were going to have and didn't happen and then this year, thought there would be a massive allocation out of equities. i think that shows the first quarter is not going to be a one shot off the the risk markets. >> george, thanks for joining us this morning. we appreciate that. and now let's just remind you what else is still to come. two of the biggest names in hedge funds are locking horns over herbalife. we'll tell you what you need to know, coming up. with hotwire's low prices, we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so our hotels were half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash befor
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
environment. the nature of our debate of cyber has been the digital pearl harbor. the greater national security threat is the gradual loss of intellectual property. it is effort by a thousand cuts. part of the challenge at 35 is not just scaling costs but the leakage through cyber theft, which does not mean someone else can build it but they are gaining knowledge and capacity in a way they would not have been able to. something that may have given you a ten-year advantage does not give you that kind of advantage at technological capacity. >> i would like to tie it back to our economy and jobs. president obama said the focus would be to increase jobs. i come back to paul. you said that the success of our [indiscernible]channel some of the budget from the dod to the state department. i take this time to say that hillary clinton is coming back to work today. i wish her great recovery. if we have projected our intent is to china and the world. looking at the way china has been aggressive many ways in the south china sea. [indiscernible]how do we look into that without freedom of navigation
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